Overuse of nasal steroids

Immunotherapy injections carry a small risk of a severe allergic reaction. These reactions occur with a frequency of 6 of every 10,000 injections. The symptoms usually begin within 30 minutes of the injection. For this reason, patients are required to remain in the office after routine injections so that such a reaction could be quickly treated. Because drugs called beta-blockers may interfere with the ability to treat these reactions, people who take beta-blockers are often advised to avoid immunotherapy. If patients are getting allergy shots and another clinician prescribes a beta-blocker medicine for high blood pressure or another reason, the patients must make sure to tell their allergy clinician.

This treatment is sometimes used, mainly in cases where symptoms are severe and not helped by other treatments. It is done using a series of injections of the allergen causing the rhinitis, in increasing quantities. The idea is that your immune system will become desensitised to the allergen. This means that the allergic response that your body mounts when it is exposed to the allergen in the future is reduced, so improving your symptoms. Another technique is being developed which involves placing the allergen under the tongue. However, this may not yet be widely available.

Topical antibiotics are a relatively new treatment option that has become popular for post surgical patients with chronic resistant bacteria.  A variety of antimicrobials including vancomycin and aminoglycosides that cannot be administered by mouth are available as a nasal spray or wash.  Recent studies have suggested that large volume nasal washes do a better job delivering antibiotics into the sinuses than nebulized sprays.  These antibiotics can be combined with potent antifungal medications and steroids, each of which will be selected by your physician based on culture results, and  custom mixed for you by a compounding pharmacist.  Bactroban nasal cream (mupirocin) can be applied inside the nostrils to reduce colonization with methicillin-resistant staph aureus (MRSA).

Avoid smoking, which can increase the risk of sinus trouble. Experts advise rinsing out the nose twice a day with saltwater to minimize symptoms and flare-ups of sinusitis, including after sinus surgery. Nasal irrigation involves pouring or squirting a saline solution — from a neti pot or squeeze bottle — into one nostril and letting it drip out through the other. Doing so can help thin the mucus, reduce swelling and wash out any germs, allergens or inflammatory cells or proteins from the nose. A 2007 scientific review concluded that adding saline nasal irrigation to standard therapies is likely to improve symptom control in chronic sinusitis.

Nasal congestion is commonly caused by allergic rhinitis, or hay fever. This occurs when pollen, dust, mold spores, or other allergens are inhaled and irritate the nasal passage. Other causes of nasal congestion include the common cold or flu, a deviated septum, sinusitis or sinus infections, reaction to certain medications. Additionally, nasal congestion occurs in many women during pregnancy. In many individuals, nasal congestion is caused by food allergies. Those who are lactose intolerant often find themselves suffering from a stuffy nose. Your doctor can conduct allergy tests to identify your specific type of food allergy and recommend a new diet. Reducing the amount of dairy in your diet in addition to carbohydrates and sugar can improve the quality of your diet and reduce nasal congestion.

Overuse of nasal steroids

overuse of nasal steroids

Avoid smoking, which can increase the risk of sinus trouble. Experts advise rinsing out the nose twice a day with saltwater to minimize symptoms and flare-ups of sinusitis, including after sinus surgery. Nasal irrigation involves pouring or squirting a saline solution — from a neti pot or squeeze bottle — into one nostril and letting it drip out through the other. Doing so can help thin the mucus, reduce swelling and wash out any germs, allergens or inflammatory cells or proteins from the nose. A 2007 scientific review concluded that adding saline nasal irrigation to standard therapies is likely to improve symptom control in chronic sinusitis.

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