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  Anticipated CPB Review Date: May 11

0462 - Migraine and Cluster Headache: Nonsurgical Management
0464 - Serum Marker Screening for Down Syndrome
0465 - Mifepristone (RU 486)
0466 - Clinical Trials, Coverage of Routine Patient Care Costs
0467 - Vestibular Autorotation Test (VAT)
0468 - Terbutaline Pump for Preterm Labor
0469 - Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation and Cranial Electrical Stimulation
0471 - Tuberculosis Testing
0472 - Thoracic Electrical Bioimpedance for Cardiac Output Monitoring
0473 - Vaccines for Travel
0474 - Total Body Plethysmography
0475 - Coblation Non-thermal Volumetric Tissue Reduction
0476 - Influenza Rapid Diagnostic Tests
0477 - Balloon Valvuloplasty
0479 - Respiratory Devices: Incentive Spirometers and Intermittent Positive Pressure Breathing Machines
0480 - Tourette Syndrome
0481 - Tables and Boards
0482 - Compression Garments for the Legs
0483 - Anthrax Vaccine/Treatment
0484 - Glaucoma Surgery
0485 - Autonomic Testing / Sudomotor Tests
0489 - Vision Therapy
0490 - Transpupillary Thermal Therapy
0491 - Coronary Artery Brachytherapy and Other Adjuncts to Coronary Interventions
0492 - Radiofrequency Tumor Ablation
0493 - Kidney Transplantation
0494 - Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation for Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma
0495 - Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation for Hodgkin's Disease
0496 - High Dose Chemotherapy and Bone Marrow or Peripheral Stem Cell Transplant for Selected Childhood Solid Tumors
0497 - Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation for Multiple Myeloma
0500 - Intermittent Pneumatic Compression Devices
0501 - Gonadotropin-Releasing Hormone Analogs and Antagonists
0502 - Nerve Conduction Velocity Studies
0503 - Suction Pumps
0504 - Hyperhidrosis (Hyperhydrosis)
0505 - Ambulatory Assist Devices: Walkers, Canes, and Crutches
0507 - Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation for Breast Cancer
0508 - Cataract Removal Surgery
0509 - Contact Dissolution for Gallstones

Meta-analyses of placebo-controlled trials suggest that testosterone therapy in physiological doses is significantly associated with increased haematocrit, reduced high-density lipoprotein cholesterol and prostatic symptoms. 29 , 30 If prostate cancer has been excluded, there appears to be no increased risk of induction by testosterone therapy. There is inconsistent evidence regarding the risk of cardiovascular events. 29-31 A recent meta-analysis suggested increased cardiovascular risk and reported publication biases. 32 Long-term safety data are lacking, but recent reports more strongly suggest an increased risk of cardiovascular events in older men. 3 , 4 This has prompted the Endocrine Society to issue a warning statement. 5 The results and safety of long-term prospective controlled trials of testosterone therapy are awaited.

18) http:///pubmed/19179058
Nutr Metab Cardiovasc Dis. 2009 Sep;19(7):504-10. Epub 2009 Jan 28.
A high menaquinone intake reduces the incidence of coronary heart disease.   Gast GC, de Roos NM, Sluijs I, Bots ML, Beulens JW, Geleijnse JM, Witteman JC, Grobbee DE, Peeters PH, van der Schouw Julius Center for Health Sciences and Primary Care, University Medical Center Utrecht, 3508 GA Utrecht, The Netherlands.
Abstract BACKGROUND AND AIM: Vitamin K dependent proteins have been demonstrated to inhibit vascular calcification. Data on the effect of vitamin K intake on coronary heart disease (CHD) risk, however, are scarce. To examine the relationship between dietary vitamins K(1) and K(2) intake, and its subtypes, and the incidence of CHD.
METHODS AND RESULTS: We used data from the Prospect-EPIC cohort consisting of 16,057 women, enrolled between 1993 and 1997 and aged 49-70 years, who were free of cardiovascular diseases at baseline. Intake of vitamin K and other nutrients was estimated with a food frequency questionnaire. Multivariate Cox proportional hazards models were used to analyse the data. After a mean+/-SD follow-up of +/- years, we identified 480 incident cases of CHD. Mean vitamin K(1) intake was +/- microg/d and vitamin K(2) intake was +/- microg/d. After adjustment for traditional risk factors and dietary factors, we observed an inverse association between vitamin K(2) and risk of CHD with a Hazard Ratio (HR) of [95% CI -] per 10 microg/d vitamin K(2) intake. This association was mainly due to vitamin K(2) subtypes MK-7, MK-8 and MK-9. Vitamin K(1) intake was not significantly related to CHD.  CONCLUSIONS:  A high intake of menoquinones, especially MK-7, MK-8 and MK-9, could protect against CHD. However, more research is necessary to define optimal intake levels of vitamin K intake for the prevention of CHD.

The care of the hand in the post-operative period is very important in helping to ensure a good result. Initially the aims are comfort and elevation. These are met by keeping the hand up (elevated) especially in the first few days and by use of a long acting local anaesthetic (Bupivicaine). The local anaesthetic lasts at least 12 hours and sometimes 48 hours. Patients should start taking painkillers before the pain starts . on return home or whilst still in hospital and for at least 24 hours from there. This way most of our patients report little or any pain.
The patient is reviewed in clinic after within 2 weeks of the operation. Typically dissolvable stitches are used so they should not require to be removed. A splint may be provided by the physiotherapists particularly following joint replacement. Careful follow up is required to ensure a successful result with good relief of pain and a good range of movement.
The hand can be used for normal activity after the first few days. Wrist movement will depend upon the scale of the operation. Typically most of the movement gained following surgery occurs in the first 6 weeks but the wrist seems to be more forgiving and will regain movement quite late (even after several months) nonetheless early movement is encouraged where appropriate. The key is regular long gentle stretches both into straightening and into bending. Ideally these should be performed for 5 mins in each direction (feeling the stretch but without pain) once an hour. In practical terms most people mange 5-6 times a day. Elevation and icing the elbow also help reduce swelling and thus pain and improve movement.
Most patients can drive after a 1-2 weeks following arthroscopy or denervation, and 6-8 weeks following the larger operations. Most patients return to work following arthroscopy or denervation in 2-3 weeks, but this varies with occupation; heavy manual work usually takes about 6 weeks. Following the larger operations patients return to light work in 6-8 weeks and heavy work not before 3 months if ever.
The scars should be massaged by the patient 3 times a day with a bland soft cream for 3 months once the wound is well healed (typically after 2 weeks). This reduces the scar sensitivity which can be a nuisance.

Define pip steroids

define pip steroids

The care of the hand in the post-operative period is very important in helping to ensure a good result. Initially the aims are comfort and elevation. These are met by keeping the hand up (elevated) especially in the first few days and by use of a long acting local anaesthetic (Bupivicaine). The local anaesthetic lasts at least 12 hours and sometimes 48 hours. Patients should start taking painkillers before the pain starts . on return home or whilst still in hospital and for at least 24 hours from there. This way most of our patients report little or any pain.
The patient is reviewed in clinic after within 2 weeks of the operation. Typically dissolvable stitches are used so they should not require to be removed. A splint may be provided by the physiotherapists particularly following joint replacement. Careful follow up is required to ensure a successful result with good relief of pain and a good range of movement.
The hand can be used for normal activity after the first few days. Wrist movement will depend upon the scale of the operation. Typically most of the movement gained following surgery occurs in the first 6 weeks but the wrist seems to be more forgiving and will regain movement quite late (even after several months) nonetheless early movement is encouraged where appropriate. The key is regular long gentle stretches both into straightening and into bending. Ideally these should be performed for 5 mins in each direction (feeling the stretch but without pain) once an hour. In practical terms most people mange 5-6 times a day. Elevation and icing the elbow also help reduce swelling and thus pain and improve movement.
Most patients can drive after a 1-2 weeks following arthroscopy or denervation, and 6-8 weeks following the larger operations. Most patients return to work following arthroscopy or denervation in 2-3 weeks, but this varies with occupation; heavy manual work usually takes about 6 weeks. Following the larger operations patients return to light work in 6-8 weeks and heavy work not before 3 months if ever.
The scars should be massaged by the patient 3 times a day with a bland soft cream for 3 months once the wound is well healed (typically after 2 weeks). This reduces the scar sensitivity which can be a nuisance.

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